From the Editor


CarolinaFireJournal - Gwen Shuford
Gwen Shuford Editor
10/19/2016 -

Fall is here and with the changing of seasons and finalizing of the year, I always seem to find myself reflecting back on what went right and what can be improved. It is also the holiday season, which for a lot of us can cause an array of feelings. If that is not enough then you have the New Year filled with the promise of change. Learning from the past makes us better and improving our weak areas make us stronger. Dr. David Greene reminded me of how the industry changed drastically after 9/11 and “The Lessons That Were Learned.”

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Gwen Shuford
21 years

For those of you that do not follow David’s column each quarter, I advise you to start. David is a wealth of knowledge and is dedicated to constant learning. Best of all, he is selfless enough to share his time with us. In fact, his constant learning earned him his doctorate after many years of working towards it. 

Since 9/11, a great deal has been accomplished to protect our borders, our infrastructure and our overall way of life. Unfortunately, terrorist threats and influences like ISIS, as well as “home grown” terrorist activities in our schools, the workplace and public sector is a reality. Look at the violence just this year. It is obvious we live in much difficult times. In today’s world we can no longer ignore the impact these events have on us. A lot of the burden lies on our law enforcement and first responders because we have grown accustomed to them protecting us.  Let’s face it, much responsibility lies on their shoulders. 

You can expect to see the journal addressing Active Shooter Response Training in coming issues. The Journal staff realizes how important it is to keep the probability of these incidents reoccurring on the forefront of everyone’s mind and the need to be extremely prepared. It can happen anywhere at any time. We have begun looking for experts in the field of training first responders to prepare them before it happens, and respond appropriately during and after an attack. Protection gear is imperative to keep our first responders safe and more confident when dealing with these casualties.

Thank you to those that reach out to us when a need arises and for allowing us to be a small part of your world. Be safe and keep training.

Gwen

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Issue 33.3 | Winter 2018

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